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Frequently Asked Questions

Our welded aluminum hulls are warranted in writing against structural defects in material or workmanship for as long as the original purchaser owns the boat. For details and coverage guidelines, including transferability of the limited warranty, please see the written Weldcraft Limited Warranty and Owner’s Manual at your local dealer.

CO POISONING GIVES NO WARNING!! SYMPTOMS MAY NOT PRECEDE UNCONSCIOUSNESS!!!!!

OWNERS OF BOATS HAVING THE FULL CAMPER BACK OR STERN COVERS WITH A CENTER REAR OPENING – NOTE!!

CO poisoning is most likely to occur when a boat is in a forward motion with the forward passenger compartment closed and the stern open. (Removal of rear center panel) also known as The Station Wagon Effect.

CO poisoning may also occur from a leak in an exhaust system or from another boat moored alongside, running a generator.

Inboard Models

IMPORTANT: The first 10 hours of operation id the engine break – in period. Correct break – in is essential to obtain minimum oil consumption and maximum engine performance. DURING THE BREAK – IN PERIOD, THE FOLLOWING RULES MUST BE OBSERVED

  • Do not operate below 1500 RPM for extended periods of time for first 10 hours. Shift into gear as soon as possible after starting and advance throttle above 1500 RPM if conditions permit safe operation.
  • Do not operate at one speed consistently for extended periods.
  • Do not exceed 3/4 throttle during first 10 hours. during next 10 hours, occasional operation at full throttle is permissible (5 minutes at a time maximum.)
  • AVOID FULL THROTTLE ACCELERATION FROM IDLE SPEED.
  • Do not operate at full throttle until engine reaches normal operating temperature.
  • Frequently check crankcase oil level. Add oil if needed. It is normal for oil consumption to be high during break-in period.

AFTER 10-HOUR BREAK-IN PERIOD, DRAIN CRANKCASE OIL AND REPLACE OIL FILTER (SEE MAINTENANCE). FILL CRANK-CASE WITH CORRECT OIL (SEE SPECIFICATIONS). MANUFACTURER RECOMMENDS: CASTROL 20-50 MOTOR OIL.

OUTBOARD POWER PLANTS: REFER TO THE MANUFACTURERS OWNERS MANUAL (ENCLOSED IN YOUR ORIGINAL PURCHASE INFORMATION PACKET).

After first 10 hours of operation, an authorized weldcraft dealer should be contacted for the following maintenance. The boat owner is responsible for any charges.

  • Change crankcase oil and filter.
  • Hurth transmission (if so equipped) change filter.
  • Check all fluid levels.
  • COOLING SYSTEM – Insect all hoses for damage and deterioration; check all hose clamps for adequate tightness.
  • Check carburetor adjustment.
  • Inspect ignition system and timing.
  • Check for loose, missing or damaged parts.
  • Check shift and throttle cable adjustments – lubricate and inspect for loose, damaged or missing parts.
  • STEERING SYSTEM – Lubricate and inspect for loose, damaged or missing parts.
  • Inspect all drive belts.
  • Check engine alignment.
  • COMPLETE ENGINE EXHAUST SYSTEM – Inspect for damage and deterioration; check all hose clamps for adequate tightness.

 

Most boat owners like to perform at least a certain amount of their boat maintenance themselves to ensure continuing good performance and reliability.

To avoid unnecessary trips to the service center, it might be useful to have a checklist which can be run through systematically, in the hope of pinpointing the problem quickly. The boat can be divided into three categories – jet unit, engine, and hull.

If something is “wrong” with the boat it is usually poor acceleration and load carrying, coupled with excessive fuel consumption or engine RPM’s. It could be unusual noise coming from the mechanicals, or possibly just poor top speed. All of these things may be present to some degree, but the usual complaint is that the boat is just plain “gutless”.

TACHOMETER

The most important single instrument on the boat when considering performance drop-off is the engine tachometer. The great thing about jet boats is that the engine RPM’s should remain the same throughout the life of the boat, regardless of age, loading, water conditions, towing, whatever.

There is no situation where the RPM’s should be different from when the boat was new, and as an owner, you will know what these are. At any time, you should be able to open the throttle fully and get exactly the same maximum reading you have been use to. Or perhaps you are finding it needs more RPM’s to cruse your normal load? Rpm’s are a most important indicator of proper operation of the boat.

It is important at this stage to feel confident that your tachometer is reading accurately.

Now we come to our check list, and determination of which major area is a problem. The simplest way is a check on the RPM’s first. They could be normal, high, low, and this will pin point the place to look:

  1. Normal maximum RPM = hull problem. If the boat is performing poorly and the maximum RPM’s are normal and what you are used to, you can look to the hull and some external parts. These include:
    1. Overload: Too much weight aboard.
    2. Balance: Either too much weight aft, which will make the nose to be too high and make planing difficult, or if the weight is too far forward, it will cause the nose to plow, difficult steering, wetness, and poor top speed.
    3. Reverse bucket: Is the bucket dragging in the reverse steam? Make sure the control is fully up.
    4. Excessive hull drag: Is there some external hull obstruction such as rough surface, broken keel strips, or other reason impeding the smooth flow of water over the hull bottom? A visual check on the trailer should reveal if there is. Metal hulls can have a “hook” bashed into them forward of the transom which can cause the bow to plow. The planning surface forward of the transom six to nine feet should be true and flat.
  2. High RPM’s = jet unit problem. Higher than normal RPM’s lack of thrust, slipping clutch feel, engine racing and no go?
    1. Blockage: The most common problem is weeds and stones blocking the intake gate. Also be aware of ski rope, fishing line plastic bags winding around the pump shaft. Small sticks and stones can become lodged in the impeller affecting the performance dramatically; objects trapped in the impeller can cause the rotating assembly to be out of balance, causing severe vibration. Make sure the water passage through the jet is clear.
    2. Impeller wear: The heart of the jet is the impeller, and its condition. If you run in shallow gravel beds or across sand bars the leading edges will become dull and inefficient. Pumping sand will increase the wearing to impeller clearance, causing cavitation and loss of performance.
    3. Bowl / stator vanes: Its not too much of a problem, but the leading edge of the fixed stator vanes can become blunt and damaged.
    4. Air Leaks: If excessive air leaks into the intake ahead of the impeller, the jet unit will “slip”. Possible sources of air leaks are through a faulty gland seal, which is usually accompanied by a static water leak into the boat when standing idle.
    5. So if the gland is worn out and leaking into the boat with the engine off, it can also suck air when accelerating on to plane, and if this happens, then the thrust is reduced dramatically. Air can also be introduced into the system via the inspection cover, so you will want to make sure the cover is tight.
  3. Low RPM = Engine problem. There is generally no way the jet unit can overload the engine and bring the RPM’s down. If the RPM’s are down from usual, it is almost certain to be an engine problem. A compression check will usually reveal leaking piston rings or valves, but the most common reasons fir reduced engine power are:
    1. Throttle: Check that the throttle is opening fully.
    2. Fuel: The fuel supply must be adequate for the engine size. Racing boats frequently have a fuel pressure gauge which is with the tachometer, probably the most important engine instrument. Sufficient fuel must be reaching the engine.
    3. Air to the engine: The carburetor must be getting its full quota of cool air. It the engine has to work to get adequate air, and if it is hot air, this will reduce power.
    4. Ignition spark: Be satisfied the ignition system is operating properly. A problem here is usually indicated by rough running or missing engine.
    5. Exhaust: Check fro a free flowing exhaust system. some silencers can become blocked, rubber hose disintegrate internally, or there is excessive water injection. Such things can cause excessive back pressure and reduce power.

    Provided your engine is getting is full quota of air and fuel, and is getting enough spark and at the right time, the engine will usually be OK, and maximum PRM’s will result. However, if the RPM’s are down and you believe the tachometer, look for an engine problem. The hull, engine, and jet unit are the three main areas to look at when your performance is down.

  4. D. Excessive noise. This can often be a concern even if there is not a reduction in performance. The most common causes of noises are: 1. Cavitation: The jet unit is starved for water, and usually sounds like a rattle or a can of loose bolts in the back of the boat. Most likely a blocked intake grate. 2. Moan or whine: The jet unit can exhibit some “turbine whine” not unlike a turbo-charger noise but you will know what is usual with your boat. However, if you have a new more obvious moan/whine, especially id it is a very low frequency grumble at idle that increases with engine RPM’s then it is likely to be rough/worn/water damage thrust bearing. If water has gotten into the bearing, it is usually as a result of a flooded bilge at some time on a warm bearing, then water can be sucked in as it cools. 3. Periodic vibration: Often at specific RPM’s and disappearing at other throttle openings is probably a torsional vibration emanating most likely from the universal joints on the drive shaft. Check them for worn/slack joint needle rollers, or if they have been installed incorrectly after an overhaul.

AMERICAN TURBINE, P.O. BOX 699, ASOTIN, WA 99402

COLD WEATHER START UP

1. Check oil
2. Check coolant
3. Inspect hoses, belts, etc.
4. Start engine and check for circulation of cooling water through exhaust manifolds. If no water flows through manifold petcocks shut off engine and find ice restriction;
CAUTION! CONTINUED RUNNING WITH NO WATER CIRCULATION COULD RESULT IN SEVERE OVERHEATING AND PERMANENT DAMAGE TO THE ENGINE.

COLD WEATHER SHUT DOWN

1. After removing boat from water, open bilge plug hole, open manifold petcocks to drain water (not required if equipped with self drain).
2. If engine cooling water lines are equipped with flush tees, remove caps and drain water.

OPERATING TIPS

1. Check oil and temperature gauge often.
2. After hard running, idle engine one minute before shut down.
3. Avoid backing off beach in excess of 1500 R.P.M.’S
4. Avoid over loading your boat.
5. Do not force controls. If reverse gate becomes stuck – lift reverse gate by hand. This will free sand that is sticking in gate.
6. If vibrates, clean debris from jet thru hand hole clean out.
7. Always flush jet and engine in fresh water after salt water use.
8. When stuck on sand or gravel bar, do turn power off. Sand and gravel will do extensive damage to jet, plus clog water line to engine causing extreme engine over-heating and possible severe damage.

IMPORTANT: If boats is operated during periods of freezing temperature, precautions must be taken to prevent freezing damage to power package.

Refer to Cold weather or extended storage.

1. If debris or rocks are ingested into the suction side of the jet, damage may occur.

Symptoms of debris entry may be:

      A. Over heating

 

      B. Cavitation (aeration of jet drive)

 

      C. Poor performance

 

    D. Noisy jet drive

2. If rocks or debris are ingested into the jet drive:

      A. Decrease R.P.M.’S

 

      B. Drive boat to a safe place at partial throttle

 

      C. Shut off engine and remove ignition key

 

      D. Turn on bilge pump

 

      E. Remove clean out cover bolts

 

      F. Remove clean out cover

NOTE:

      For certain pump models the clean out cover is inside the hull, so upon removal of cover water will begin to enter the bilge area. By intermittently replacing and removing the cover, the debris may be cleared and give the bilge pump time to catch up with the entry of water.

 

      G. After debris has been removed re-install cover and bolts

 

      H. Be sure there are no leaks around cover

 

      I. Check bilge for removal of water by the bilge pump

 

      J1. Restart engine

 

      J2. Check engine temperature

 

    J3. TRy throttling up normally and check performance

NOTE: After debris entry in shallow water always check “intake grate” for rocks sticking between the bars upon removal of boat from water, remove these rocks.

3. If excessive sand is ingested into the jet drive: symptoms of sand entry are

      A. Warning buzzer sound

 

    B. Immediate and excessive overheating

4. Open petcocks in exhaust manifolds to check for sand.

5. Remove exhaust manifold cooling hoses – check for sand.

6. Remove end caps on heat exchanger and flush.

7. Replace hoses and heat exchanger end caps.

8. Start engine amd check for jet water flow through exhaust manifolds and hoses.

NOTE: If debris or sand is still present in cooling system repeat steps.

The length is measured from end to end excluding sheer. This is a straight line measurement of the overall length from the foremost part of the boat to the aftermost part of the boat, measured parallel to the centerline. Bow sprits, bumpkins, rudders, outboard motor brackets, and similar fittings or attachments are not include in the measurement. Length shall be stated in feet and inches.

After recovery, immediate service by an authorized Weldcraft dealer is required to prevent serious damage to power package.

Crankcase Oil – Inboard Models

To help obtain optimum engine performance and to provide maximum protection, we strongly recommend the use of a quality 4-cycle marine engine oil. If not available, a good grade, straight weight, detergent automotive oil of correct viscosity, with an api classification of sg/cd ii, may be used.

At ambient temperatures below 32° F. (0° C) sae 20w is advisable. In all cases a quality 4-cycle marine engine oil is preferred.

IMPORTANT: The use of non-detergent oils, multi-viscosity oils (other than 20w-40 or 20w-50), low quality oils or oils which contain solid additives specifically are not recommended.

Oil filter should always be changed with oil.

Important: Use of improper gasoline can damage your engine seriously. Engine damage resulting from use improper gasoline is considered misuse of engine, and the resulting damage will not be covered by the Limited Warranty. Octane Rating of 89 or Higher Must Be Used.

The use of any good grade unleaded regular or premium gasolines with a minimum posted octane rating { (A.K.I.) Anti-knock Index } of 89 satisfactory for use in your engine.

Gasolines containing alcohol, either Methyl Alcohol (Methanol) or Ethyl Alcohol (Ethanol) may cause increased:

  • Corrosion of Metal Parts.
  • Deterioration of Elastomer and Plastic Parts
  • Fuel Permeation through Flexible Fuel Lines.
  • Wear and Damage of Internal Engine Parts.
  • Starting and Operating Difficulties.
  • Some of these adverse effects are due to the tendency of gasolines containing alcohol to absorb moisture from air, resulting in a phase of water and alcohol separating from the gasoline in the fuel tank.
  • The adverse effects of alcohol are more severe with Methyl Alcohol (Methanol) and are worse with increasing with increasing alcohol content.

WARNING! FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD: FUEL LEAKAGE FROM ANY PART OF FUEL SYSTEM CAN BE A FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD WHICH CAN CAUSE SERIOUS BODILY INJURY OR DEATH. CAREFUL PERIODIC INSPECTION OF ENTIRE FUEL SYSTEM IS MANDATORY, PARTICULARLY AFTER STORAGE. ALL FUEL COMPONENTS INCLUDING FUEL TANKS, WHETHER PLASTIC, METAL OR FIBERGLASS, FUEL LINES, PRIMER BULBS, FITTINGS, FUEL FILTERS AND CARBURETORS SHOULD BE INSPECTED FOR LEAKAGE, SOFTENING, HARDENING, SWELLING OR CORROSION. ANY SIGN OF LEAKAGE OR DETERIORATION REQUIRES REPLACEMENT BEFORE FURTHER ENGINE OPERATION.

BECAUSE OF POSSIBLE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ALCOHOL IN GASOLINE, IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT ONLY ALCOHOL-FREE GASOLINE BE USED WHERE POSSIBLE. IF ONLY FUEL CONTAINING ALCOHOL IS AVAILABLE, OR IF THE PRESENCE OF ALCOHOL IS UNKNOWN, INCREASED INSPECTION FREQUENCY FOR LEAKS AND ABNORMALITIES IS REQUIRED.

IMPORTANT: WHEN OPERATING A REDLINE ENGINE ON GASOLINE CONTAINING ALCOHOL, STORAGE OF GASOLINE IN THE FUEL TANK FOR LONG PERIODS SHOULD BE AVOIDED. LONG PERIODS OF STORAGE, COMMON TO BOATS, CREATE UNIQUE PROBLEMS. IN CARS, ALCOHOL-BLEND FUELS NORMALLY ARE CONSUMED BEFORE THEY CAN ABSORB ENOUGH MOISTURE TO CAUSE TROUBLE, BUT BOATS OFTEN SIT IDLE LONG ENOUGH FOR SEPARATION TO TAKE PLACE. IN ADDITION, INTERNAL CORROSION MAY TAKE PLACE DURING STORAGE IF ALCOHOL HAS WASHED PROTECTIVE OIL FILMS FROM INTERNAL COMPONENTS.

IT IS ALSO RECOMMENDED THAT IF YOU DO HAVE TO STORE YOUR BOAT FOR LONG PERIODS (IE; MONTH OR LONGER) THAT YOU USE A FUEL STABILIZER (SUCH AS STA-BIL) IN THE APPROPRIATE AMOUNT SUGGESTED BY MANUFACTURER.

ATTENTION OUTBOARD WELDCRAFT OWNERS: IF YOUR WELDCRAFT BOAT IS EQUIPPED WITH AN OUTBOARD MOTOR, WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT YOU READ THOROUGHLY THE OWNERS MANUAL AND FOLLOW ALL SAFETY AND OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING THE OPERATION OF THE ENGINE.

Always check battery condition before towing

A. Check engine compartment for fuel vapor, water leaks, and engine oil level. A basic safety check, anything out of the ordinary.

B. Run bilge blower before starting engine

C. Use # 1 or # 2 battery by itself. Keep one battery in reserve.

D. Use both batteries when engine cranks slow in cold weather, start engine, then switch back to one battery.

E. Before launching, start and warm engine at 1200 to 1400 RPMS.

F. While waiting for engine to warm up check accessories and steering response, also check shifting response. Monitor gauges.

G. After running engine at high rpms or after running extended amounts of time, idle engine for a few minutes before shutting off. To dissipate heat and to keep from dieseling.

H. Change oil after first 10 hours.

I. Grease thrust (front) bearing and tail bearing. At same intervals as oil change, also grease u-joints at the same time. Change oil every 15-20 hours depending on usage. Clean flame arrestor as needed.

J. Check antifreeze before winter season.

K. Always drain water cooled exhaust manifolds during cold weather to avoid breakage.

L. Excessive fuel consumption can be caused by worn spark plugs. Check condition and replace.

M. Change fuel filter at least yearly, in wet climates change every six months.

N. Keeping fuel tank full helps prevent internal moisture build up.

O. Keep carburetor linkage well cleaned and lubricated

P. Always check to see if all steering and shifting bolts and nuts are tight before launching boat.

Q. Check battery levels during regular oil change intervals

R. Keep water out of bilge as this can affect starter operation.

S. If engine electrical system is heavily loaded, it is possible for main breaker to shut down. reset by pushing in. heavy draw (amps) items, lights stereo equipment ect., are not recommended for extended usage, this can weaken charging system and cause extended battery charging requirements.

T. Make sure battery switch is in off position when boat is not in use or when boat is in storage.

U. If engine ”diesels” a hydrostatic cylinder lock may take place. Do not crank engine in this condition. Damage may occur!! remove spark plugs, crank engine over until cylinders are empty. Clean and dry spark plugs, reinstall, and restart.

V. Carburetor is a holley 4 barrel marine, part #”s are on carburetor.

X. Parts # is on distributor. (if distributor is electronic, no points)

When ordering parts refer to engine as;
1. Cubic inches
2. Model and serial number
3. Year of manufacturing

Y. Check lugnuts before you tow. Lubricate trailer bearings when you change oil or as needed.

Z. Check brake fluid level often.

1. Check tire pressure before you tow.

2. Check all trailer lighting before you tow.

3. Check condition of winch and winch strap often.

4. Keep trailers electrical plug clean and in good condition.

Polishing the sides (unpainted) and gunwales of the boat can be incorporated into your cleaning schedule.

A low abrasive aluminum polish may be used to keep the sides and gunwales polished. Weldcraft recommends, “Mothers Mag Wheel Polish, Flitz Metal Polish” or a comparable product.

If heavy water spotting occurs a heavy machine rubbing compound may be used on unpainted surfaces. The compound is applied to the hull, then finished by buffing with a high speed electric buffer on a soft wool pad. The high shine factory polish is then possible by finishing with mothers mag wheel polish on a clean new wool pad.

Aids To Navigation

Navigational aids are similar to traffic signs. They are placed at various points along our waterways to boaters locate their position and steer clear of danger.

The expression ”red right returning” simply means that the red buoys are passed on your starboard (right) side when returning to port from the open sea (or going upstream). The opposite is also true when leaving port toward the sea, red buoys are port (left) side and green buoys are starboard (right).

All navigational aids are protected by law. It is a criminal offense to damage or interfere with them. Never tie your boat to a buoy, day beacon, or light structure mooring. If you should collide with or damage an aid to navigation, report it immediately to the Coast Guard or local sheriff’s office.

Rules of the Road

To help everyone avoid collisions, the following rules of the road were set up. On the water the stand-on boat has the right of way. The give-way boat must keep out of the stand-on boat’s way. (Navigation laws, fine of up to $350).

Crossing Situation:

The boat to starboard (right is the stand-on boat and has the right-of-way. It must hold course and speed. The give- way boat keeps clear and passes behind the stand-on boat.

Overtaking:

A boat being overtaken has the right-of-way. It must hold course and speed. The passing boat must keep a sufficient distance to avoid collision or endangering the other boat with its wake.

Meeting Head-on or Nearly So:

When two boats approach each other “head-on”, each must alter course to the right to avoid collision. If the two boats are far to the left of each other, no change in course is necessary

More Rules of the Road:

  • Less maneuverable boats such as sailboats, rowboats, and canoes usually have right-of-way over powerboats, except in an overtaking situation.
  • Small boats must yield to deep draft vessels in narrow channels. Deep draft vessels are limited in maneuverability and to navigating within the channel.
  • Anchoring a boat in a position that obstructs a passageway ordinarily used by other boats is against the law. Common sense permits operators to deviate from right-of-way rules in order to avoid immediate collision.

Proper Lookout

Boat operators should be experienced enough to recognize lights, waterway markers and boats as well as other hazards, and maintain a proper lookout for danger at all times.

Safe Speed

Boat operators must maintain a safe speed at all times to avoid collision. Safe speed takes into consideration such factors as visibility, traffic, weather conditions, and vessel maneuverability.

Anchoring

To anchor, bring the bow into the wind or current and put the engine in neutral. When the vessel comes to a stop, lower, do not throw, the anchor over the bow. The anchor line should be 5 to 7 times the depth of water. Anchoring a small boat at the stern has caused many to capsize and sink. Do not anchor at the stern.

Emergency Procedures

(Caution: These procedures may not apply in all situations.)

Capsizing If your boat swamps, DON’T PANIC:

      1. Grab your PFD (life jacket) or any object that floats.

2. Stay with the boat (on narrow, swift moving rivers, remain upriver of the boat). You will be more easily located by a search plane or boat. Do not swim for shore unless there is absolutely no chance of rescue and you are certain you can make it.

3. In cold water, following these procedures will help prevent hypothermia:

        a. Keep your head out of the water and don’t remove clothes or shoes.

 

        b. If possible, get in the boat to get as far out of the water as possible.

 

        c. If there are others in the water, huddle close, side to side in a circle, to help preserve body heat.

 

        d. Wear a PFD and, if alone, assume a fetal posture.

 

Recognized Distress Signals

Signals illustrated below are recognized as indicating a boat is in distress and requires assistance. However, other methods may be used.

Person Overboard

If someone falls overboard:

      1. Swing the stern of the boat away from the person to reduce propeller danger.

 

      2. Throw a lifesaving device immediately, even if the person is a swimmer. Be careful not to hit the person. A life ring is best because it can be thrown more easily and farther. Don’t wait to get a life ring if another item is closer at hand. Speed is most important.

 

      3. Keep the person in view. Have a passenger act as lookout. A night, direct the best possible light on the victim.

 

      4. Approach the person from downwind or into the (waves). The maneuver to use in approaching a person depends upon the existing conditions (water temperature, sea conditions, victim’s physical capabilities, whether you are alone, availability of other ready assistance, boat maneuvering room, etc.)

 

      5. If necessary, have your assistant put a PFD with a line attached to the boat and get into the water to help the person who fell overboard.

 

      6. Assist the person in boarding the boat. It is often difficult to climb into a boat from the water, and an individual who is hurt or cold may not be capable of getting on board without help. In small boats the weight of person suspended from the side can be enough to tip the boat and cause it to take on water. The best procedure for getting back in a small boat is over the stern or bow, depending upon the boat’s construction. Common sense dictates that the propeller must be stopped when pulling a victim in over the stern.

 

    7. Make the victim as warm and dry as possible. A person who was in the water for over 15 minutes is probably suffering from some degree of hypothermia. Do not give the victim alcohol. Seek medical help at once.

Riding On Decks Or Gunwales

The following rules apply to riding on the bow, gunwale, or transom of a motorboat.

      1. Do not ride on the starboard or port gunwales, or on the transom of a motorboat moving a speed in excess of five miles per hour unless the boat has adequate guards or railing.

 

      2. Do not sit on the deck of the bow unless the motorboat has adequate guards or railing.

 

    3. Do not ride or sit on the bow, gunwale, or transom railing while the motorboat is underway.

Alcohol And Boating

Drinking and operating a boat is a dangerous as drinking and operating a car. According to a recent study, 60% of all fatal motor boat accidents involved alcohol.

Operating a boat under the influence of intoxicant is against the law.

It is the operator’s responsibility to perform all safety checks, to ensure that all lubrication and maintenance instructions are complied with for safe operation, and to return the unit to an Authorized Weldcraft Dealer for a periodic check-up.

Normal maintenance service and replacement parts are the responsibility of the owner/operator and as such, are not considered defects in workmanship or material within the terms of the warranty. Individual operating habits and usage contribute to the need for maintenance service.

Proper maintenance and care or your power package will assure optimum performance and dependability, and will keep your overall operating expenses at a minimum.

WARNING!
THE OPERATOR (DRIVER) IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CORRECT AND SAFE OPERATION OF THE BOAT, THE EQUIPMENT ABOARD AND THE SAFETY OF ALL OCCUPANTS ABOARD. WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT THE OPERATOR READ THIS OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL AND THOROUGHLY UNDERSTAND THE OPERATIONAL INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE POWER PACKAGE AND ALL RELATED ACCESSORIES BEFORE THE BOAT IS USED.

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT OTHER OCCUPANTS BE INSTRUCTED ON PROPER START AND OPERATION PROCEDURES SO THEY WILL BE PREPARED SHOULD THEY BE REQUIRED TO OPERATE THE POWER PACKAGE AND BOAT IN AN EMERGENCY.

Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)

All boats must carry at least one U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device/life for every person aboard. Such devices must be in serviceable condition. They must not have any rips, tears, or broken straps. All devices must also be kept readily available for use in an emergency situation. Personal flotation devices in a plastic bag or in a storage compartment are not readily available.

Persons being towed are considered on board the towing boat and there must be an approved Type I, II or III device aboard for each.

Each person on board a watercraft must wear a U.S. Coast Guard- approved life jacket at all times while on open deck or cockpit of vessels that are underway. Non-swimmers should always wear PFDs. All devices must be of a size if they are designed to be worn. Adult devices do not satisfy legal requirements for children just as children’s devices do not meet flotation requirements for adults.

Inflatables

Inflatables are not approved for children nor high-impact sports such as water skiing or riding personal watercraft. Comfortable and lightweight, inflatable life jackets are more wearable and, therefore, expected to save more lives. Manufacturing standards were recently established for inflatables. The U.S. Coast Guard has approved several models that can be carried/worn in lieu of their counterpart. Boaters considering the purchase of inflatable life jackets should make sure the device has a Coast Guard approved number on the label and that instructions are complied with. Boaters relying on inflatables that are not approved, or, that are not being utilized in accordance with the label, will be considered in non-compliance by law enforcement officers.

Type I Off-shore life jacket

Intended for use off-shore, in open or coastal waters, or potentially rough seas where quick rescue may not be likely. It has greater flotation value than other PFD types and is designed to turn an unconscious person face-up. It is reversible and is available in two sizes, adult (90lbs. or more) and child (less then 90 lbs.).

Type II Near-shore buoyant vest

Designed for general boating activities and is suitable fir protected areas where rough water is not likely to be found or for activities where quick rescue is available. Not suitable for extended survival in rough or cold water.

Less buoyant than Type I. Will turn an unconscious person to a vertical or slightly face-up position. Available in several sizes.

Type III Flotation aid

Intended for general boating activities or specialized actives or specialized activities such as canoeing, skiing, or fishing due to the freedom of movement it allows. Suitable for protected areas where rough water is not likely to be found or where quick rescue is available.

Less buoyant than the Type 1. Designed to provide a stable face-up position in calm water for a conscious person floating with head tilted back. Not intended to turn or maintain an unconscious wearer face-up. Available in many sizes.

TYPE IV Throwable device

Intended to be thrown to a person who has fallen overboard. Designed to be grasped and held by user until rescued. Not suitable for rough or cold water survival. Of no use to an unconscious or exhausted person and it not recommended for non-swimmers or children.

A Type IV cushion type should never be worn on the back. A cushion worn on the back will turn a person over so their face is under water.

Provides enough buoyancy for users to hold their heads out of the water. May be either a cushion or ring buoy.

Fire Extinguishers

Each fire extinguisher is classified by Roman numeral and letter according to its size and type of fire it is meant to extinguish. The following is a listing of the fire types and their corresponding letter.

      A. Fires of ordinary combustible materials.

 

      B. Gasoline, oil and grease fires.

 

    C. Electrical fires.

Extinguishers approved for motorboats are hand-portable of either B-I or B-II classification.

An approved extinguisher bears the label of a testing laboratory and will include either Coast Guard approval number or specify “Marine Type USCG.”

Boaters should be familiar with the correct use of their extinguisher.

Lighting

All boats must show running lights between sunset and sunrise and during periods of restricted visibility.

Recommended Equipment

Along with the required equipment, Weldcraft recommends carrying the following:

  • Compass
  • Anchor
  • Fenders
  • Flashlight
  • Line
  • Bucket
  • First Aid Kit
  • Toolkit
  • Two Way Radio
  • Distress Signals

HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE

  • blockage in raw water feed hose from jet
  • sticky thermostat
  • defective heat exchange cap
  • low coolant
  • leak in cooling system or heater hose
  • possible cracked heads – lets coolant escape
  • into combusting chamber
  • restriction in hoses to exhaust manifold
  • heat exchange plugged with sand or debris

LOW OIL PRESSURE

  • low oil level
  • defective pressure sending unit – check pressure with manual gauge
  • defective oil gauge
  • low oil viscosity
  • leak in oil cooler lines or oil pan

ENGINE WILL NOT TURN OVER

  • low battery voltage
  • bad battery connection
  • corroded battery cables
  • defective solenoid
  • defective battery switch
  • defective starter
  • engine frozen (hydraulic) water on top of pistons
  • bearings in jet drive frozen
  • water in bowl of jet drive. water ring frozen to impeller
  • foreign part in teeth of starter of fly wheel

ENGINE TURNS OFF BUT WON’T START

  • no fuel to carb – check ball in fuel tank outlet
  • ignition: points frozen, not opening
  • points open but no spark – check ballast
  • resistor or coil wire or distributor cap
  • low battery voltage
  • worn spark plugs
  • water in distributor cap
  • distributor module defective

SHIFTER CONTROL WILL NOT MOVE

  • sand in between bucket and nozzle
  • bucket frozen in position
  • defective cable
  • defective control
  • cable not properly adjusted
  • pivot bolt missing or damaged

STEERING FROZEN

  • steering adaptor (jet end) contains ice and will not allow cable to move
  • defective cable
  • defective helm

FUEL GAUGE NOT WORKING

  • fuel sender not grounded
  • fuel tank sending wire not connected
  • defective sending unit wire (wire separated internally)
  • defective sending unit
  • defective gauge
  • no power to gauge

BUZZ LIGHT LOW OIL HIGH WATER TEMPERATURE

  • if buzz light sounds check gauges
  • if gauges read normal:
    possible defective buzz light sending units, oil and water temperature
    possible grounding of buzz light on steering helm

ENGINE STARTS BUT RUNS RICH

  • carburetor icing
  • floats in carburetor stuck
  • needle valve in carburetor plugged
  • choke too tight
  • choke not operating
  • secondary butterflies partly open on carburetor

ENGINE STARTS BUT RUNS ROUGH

  • carburetor problems
  • worn spark plugs
  • broken or cracked spark plugs
  • cracked distributor cap
  • corroded distributor cap terminals
  • bad spark plug wires
  • sticking advance weights in distributor
  • broken advance springs in distributor
  • disrobing cap not tightened down
  • incorrect air fuel adjustment
  • secondary butterflies partly open on carb
  • incorrect timing
  • water in fuel supply

ENGINE STARTS AND RUNS WITH HESITATION IN midrange

  • incorrectly adjusted accelerator pump
  • defective accelerator pump
  • defective spark plugs
  • distributor not giving correct advance

ENGINE WILL NOT REACH TOP RPM

  • needs tune up
  • carburetor is icing up
  • bad fuel
  • bad spark plugs
  • low compression

VOLT METER READS LOW SCALE

  • defective alternator
  • field wire not connected to alternator
  • heavy drain on charging system… example: multiple accessories being used
  • battery cables touching each other

TACHOMETER READS LOW SCALE – ENGINE O.K.

  • incorrect setting – set on #3 on back side of tachometer

TACHOMETER SLUGGISH OR INCONSISTENT

  • defective tach

NAVIGATION LIGHTS DON’T WORK

  • burned out bulbs
  • bad connection – in wiring
  • wire connector not on switch
  • defective switch

BILGE BLOWER DOES NOT OPERATE

  • needs fuse
  • metal shaving in pump pick up
  • hole in bilge hose
  • automatic switch defective
  • check wiring

If you don’t understand any portion, contact your dealer for more information.

Education

Weldcraft Boats recommends taking a boating class through the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary or the U.S. Power Squadron. These classes provide the information necessary to boat safely, and compilation of a class can be good for a discount on boat insurance. For information on Auxiliary or Power Squadron classes. call 1-800-368-5647.

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is a volunteer association of boaters. The Auxiliary promotes safe boating by offering free boating classes, working with the Coast Guard on search and rescue. patrolling races and regattas and upon invitation, conducting safety checks or privately owned boats. Law enforcement authorities are not notified if you fail the safety check.

U.S. Power Squadron

The United States Power Squadron is a nationwide association of boaters dedicated to the promotion safety, good citizenship and good fellowship afloat. Local squadrons offer a free course in Piloting and Small Boat Handling. Included in this course are classes on Equipment and Regulations. Rules of the Road, Seamanship, Safety Afloat, Compass, Aids of Navigation, Charts, and Piloting.

Weather

Before you begin a cruse, check the local “weather and sea” conditions. Detailed information can be obtained by telephone or by listing to local radio stations, Coast Guard Radio, or the National Weather Service VHF/FM broadcasts on frequencies of 162.400, 162.425 162.475, and 162.550 MHz in areas where available. Storm warning flags are displayed at selected coastal locations such as Coast Guard stations, marinas, public piers, and yacht clubs. These signals are a prediction of potentially dangerous wind or, in the case of small craft warnings, winds and seas dangerous to small boats. Boaters should know these signals and heed their warnings.

Fueling

Most fires and explosions happen after fueling. To prevent an accident, follow these rules:

  • Fuel before dark.
  • Don’t smoke or strike matches.
  • Shut off motors. Turn off electrical equipment.
  • Close all windows, doors, and openings.
  • Take portable tanks out of the boat and fill them on the dock.
  • Keep the fill nozzle in contact with the tank.
  • Fuel expands as it warms. Don’t fill tanks completely: overfilling can lead to spills.
  • Wipe up any spilled gasoline. Discard the cloth in a safe manner.
  • Ventilate for at least five minutes. Sniff around to make sure there is no order of gasoline anywhere in the boat. Periodically check the entire fuel system for leaks. Some fuels contain alcohol which can cause rubber gaskets and hoses to deteriorate, resulting in leaks.

Boat Capacity

The total weight of passengers, supplies, and motor should not exceed the capacity plate limitation(Overloading – fine of up to $350).

It’s the operator’s responsibility that supplies be carefully loaded and all passengers be properly seated. Remember:

  • Spread weight evenly.
  • Fasten gear to prevent shifting.
  • Keep passengers seated.
  • Don’t overload.

Boat Ramp Etiquette

The following tips are offered to assist you when launching and recovering your boat. To avoid unnecessarily blocking the ramp, conduct as much of the operation in the lot as possible.

LAUNCH (Recovery is basically in reverse order)

  • Be sure all required safety equipment and registration are on board.
  • Ensure tongue is securely fastened to ball hitch, remove tie downs.
  • Check condition of battery, motor and angle of drive unit. Insure bilge plugs are firmly in place.
  • Move to ramp and launch.
  • Check drive unit prior to backing down ramp. (Having a lookout or someone in the boat is helpful).
  • Unhook bow safety restraint, power or pull off trailer.
  • Run blower, start boat, move to dock for passenger pickup. (If alone, secure boat quickly and move vehicle off ramp.)
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